London Square

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London Square (working title) forms part of the Council's wider Town Hall project which will bring the former Royal London Hospital on Whitechapel Road back into public use as the Council's main administrative headquarters.

London Square refers to the piece of land located between the Royal London hospital and the forthcoming Tower Hamlets Town Hall. Following completion of the new Town Hall, the square is intended to provide important space for public enjoyment and help address the under-provision of open space in the immediate area.

London Square measures roughly 2,770 square metres and currently serves as a pedestrian access route to the four entrances to the hospital. The site is entirely hardstanding, paved in asphalt and stone pavers.

Location Plan














History

In the early 19th Century, large areas to the rear of the hospital were used as burial grounds. Over the course of the 19th Century, space became increasingly sparce and the hospital committee took the decision to create a larger burial ground further south.

This enabled the area to be used as a drying yard for the hospital and it became known as ‘Bedstead Square’. By the end of the 19th Century, the area also served a recreational purpose and included restorative gardens.

The hospital’s most famous inpatient Joseph Merrick (known cruelly as the Elephant man), found respite at the Royal London Hospital, and was thought to have resided in rooms overlooking the Square.

The patients garden once housed several trees and covered walkways which provided shade for leisurely restorative exercise. Staff and medical students at the hospital even used the area as a sporting arena and from 1893, a Clubs Union was organised to bring together various sports, social and academic clubs that were active within the institution.


London Square Today














Vision

Initial concept designs for the square were first produced in June 2018. Since then, the Council in partnership with the Hospital, has appointed a landscape architect to develop the London Square design further with a view to achieving planning permission.

The current design (as seen below) is sympathetic to the operational constraints imposed by the hospital, but importantly addresses the need for additional public open space and planting. The design encourages pedestrian movement from East Mount Street to the hospital and offers clear sight lines to the main entrance. The square also includes a mixture of formal and informal seating.

We look forward to hearing your views.


Vision for the SquareVision for the Square


Square Plan



















Drop-in Events

Two drop-in events will be held outdoors within the northern forecourt of the Royal London Hospital on:

  • Saturday 26th June 2021 between 10am and 1pm
  • Wednesday 30th June 2021 between 3pm and 7pm


Timeline

The Council intends to submit a planning application in the Summer of 2021. Completion of the square is due to coincide with occupation of the new Tower Hamlets Town Hall in 2022.



London Square (working title) forms part of the Council's wider Town Hall project which will bring the former Royal London Hospital on Whitechapel Road back into public use as the Council's main administrative headquarters.

London Square refers to the piece of land located between the Royal London hospital and the forthcoming Tower Hamlets Town Hall. Following completion of the new Town Hall, the square is intended to provide important space for public enjoyment and help address the under-provision of open space in the immediate area.

London Square measures roughly 2,770 square metres and currently serves as a pedestrian access route to the four entrances to the hospital. The site is entirely hardstanding, paved in asphalt and stone pavers.

Location Plan














History

In the early 19th Century, large areas to the rear of the hospital were used as burial grounds. Over the course of the 19th Century, space became increasingly sparce and the hospital committee took the decision to create a larger burial ground further south.

This enabled the area to be used as a drying yard for the hospital and it became known as ‘Bedstead Square’. By the end of the 19th Century, the area also served a recreational purpose and included restorative gardens.

The hospital’s most famous inpatient Joseph Merrick (known cruelly as the Elephant man), found respite at the Royal London Hospital, and was thought to have resided in rooms overlooking the Square.

The patients garden once housed several trees and covered walkways which provided shade for leisurely restorative exercise. Staff and medical students at the hospital even used the area as a sporting arena and from 1893, a Clubs Union was organised to bring together various sports, social and academic clubs that were active within the institution.


London Square Today














Vision

Initial concept designs for the square were first produced in June 2018. Since then, the Council in partnership with the Hospital, has appointed a landscape architect to develop the London Square design further with a view to achieving planning permission.

The current design (as seen below) is sympathetic to the operational constraints imposed by the hospital, but importantly addresses the need for additional public open space and planting. The design encourages pedestrian movement from East Mount Street to the hospital and offers clear sight lines to the main entrance. The square also includes a mixture of formal and informal seating.

We look forward to hearing your views.


Vision for the SquareVision for the Square


Square Plan



















Drop-in Events

Two drop-in events will be held outdoors within the northern forecourt of the Royal London Hospital on:

  • Saturday 26th June 2021 between 10am and 1pm
  • Wednesday 30th June 2021 between 3pm and 7pm


Timeline

The Council intends to submit a planning application in the Summer of 2021. Completion of the square is due to coincide with occupation of the new Tower Hamlets Town Hall in 2022.